Pertinent Sections of Florida Administrative
Codes 62-550 and 62-555

Defines cross-connections, 62-550.200:(22):

”CROSS-CONNECTION” means any physical arrangement whereby a public water supply is connected, directly or indirectly, with any other water supply system, sewer, drain, conduit, pool, storage reservoir, plumbing fixture, or other device which contains or may contain contaminated water, sewage or other waste or liquid of unknown or unsafe quality which may be capable of imparting contamination to the public water supply as the result of backflow. By-pass arrangements, jumper connections, removable sections, swivel or changeable devices and other temporary or permanent devices through which or because of which backflow could occur are considered to be cross-connections.

Prohibits cross-connections, 62-555.360(1):

Cross-connection, as defined in Rule 62-550.200, F.A.C., is prohibited. However, a person who owns or manages a public water system may interconnect to another public water system if that system is operated and maintained in accordance with this Chapter.

Requires a cross-connection control program, 62-555.360(2):

Community Water systems, and all public water systems which have service areas that are also served by reclaimed water systems regulated under Part III, of Chapter 62-610, F.A.C., shall establish and implement a routine cross-connection control program to detect and control cross-connections and prevent backflow of contaminants into the water system, This program shall include a written plan that is developed using recommended practices of the American Water Works Association set forth in Recommended Practices for Backflow Prevention and Cross-Connection Control, AWWA Manual M14, as incorporated into Rule 62-555.330 F.A.C.

What shall be done if a cross-connection exists, 62-555.360(3):

Upon discovery of a prohibited cross-connection, public water systems shall either eliminate the cross-connection by installation of an appropriate backflow prevention device acceptable to the Department or shall discontinue service until the contaminant source is eliminated.

Requires that backflow preventers be installed under the supervision of the water supplier, also states where backflow preventers should be installed, 62-555.360(4):

Only the following are considered to be backflow prevention devices. They shall be installed in agreement with and under the supervision of the supplier of water or his designated representative (plumbing inspector, etc.) at the consumer's meter, at the property line of the consumer when a meter is not used, or at a location designated by the supplier of water or the Department. The devices are:

(a) Air gap separation - A physical separation between the free-flowing discharge end of a potable water supply pipeline and an open or non-pressure receiving vessel. An “approved airgap separation” shall be at least double the diameter of the supply pipe measured vertically above the top of the rim of the vessel. In no case shall it be less than 1 inch.

(b) Reduced pressure backflow preventer - A device containing within its structure a minimum of two independently acting approved check valves, together with an automatically operating pressure differential relief valve located between the two check valves. The first check valve reduces the supply pressure a predetermined amount so that during normal flow and at cessation of normal flow the pressure between the checks shall be less than the supply pressure. In case of leakage of either check valve, the differential relief valve, by discharging to the atmosphere, shall operate to maintain the pressure between the checks less than the supply pressure. The unit shall include tightly closing shutoff valves located at each end of the device, and each device shall be fitted with properly located test cocks.

(c) Atmospheric vacuum breaker - A backflow prevention device which is operated by atmospheric pressure in combination with the force of gravity. The unit is designed to work on a vertical plane only. The one moving part consists of a poppet valve which must be carefully sized to slide in a guided chamber and effectively shut off the reverse flow water when a negative pressure exists.

(d) Pressure vacuum breaker - A pressure vacuum breaker is similar to an atmospheric vacuum breaker except that the checking unit “poppet valve” is activated by a spring. This type of vacuum breaker does not require a negative pressure to react and can be used on a pressure side of a valve.

(e) Double check valve assembly - An assembly composed of two single, independently acting, check valves, including tightly closing shutoff valves located at each end of the assembly and suitable connections for testing the water tightness of each check valve. A check valve is a valve that is drip-tight in the normal direction of flow when the inlet pressure is one psi and the outlet pressure is zero. The check valve shall permit no leakage in a direction reverse to the normal flow. The closure element (e.g. clapper) shall be internally weighted or otherwise internally loaded to promote rapid and positive closure.

(f) Residential Dual Check - A compact unit manufactured with two independent spring actuated check valves. The residential dual check is acceptable only as added backflow prevention in areas served by reuse systems defined in Chapter 62-610, Part III, F.A.C., when the cross connection control program identifies activities specific to (5)(a) and (5)(b) of this section.

Specific Authority 403.086(8), 403.861(9) FS. Law Implemented 403.086(8), 403.855(3) FS. History–New 11-19-87, Formerly 17-22.660, Amended 1-18-89, 1-3-91, 1-1-93, Formerly 17-555.360, Amended 8-28-03.

(5) Cross connection control programs specific to reuse systems defined in Chapter 62-610, Part III, F.A.C., shall consider the following:

(a) Enhanced public education efforts towards prevention of cross connections.

(b) Enhanced inspection programs for portions of the distribution systems in areas of reuse for detection and elimination of cross connections.

(c) Dual check valves shall be considered acceptable for reducing risks from back-flow only at residential properties served by reclaimed water unless:

1. Local codes, ordinances or regulations require greater levels of back-flow prevention.

2. Other hazards exist on the property that require a greater level of back-flow prevention.

Specific Authority 403.086(8), 403.861(9) FS. Law Implemented 403.086(8), 403.855(3) FS. History–New 11-19-87, Formerly 17-22.660, Amended 1-18-89, 1-3-91, 1-1-93, Formerly 17-555.360, Amended 8-28-03.

(7) Cross-connection control.

(a) No cross-connections to potable water systems shall be allowed. The permittee shall submit documentation of Department acceptance for a cross-connection control and inspection program, pursuant to Rule 62-555.360, F.A.C., for all public water supply systems located within the area to be served by reclaimed water.

(b) Reclaimed water shall not enter a dwelling unit or a building containing a dwelling unit except as allowed by Rules 62-610.476, and 62-610.479, F.A.C.

(c) Maximum obtainable separation of reclaimed water lines and domestic water lines shall be practiced. A minimum horizontal separation of three feet (outside to outside) shall be maintained between reclaimed water lines and either potable water mains or sewage collection lines. The Department shall approve smaller horizontal separation distances if one of the following conditions is met:

1. The top of the reclaimed water line is installed at least 18 inches below the bottom of the potable water line.

2. The reclaimed water line is encased in concrete.

3. The applicant provides an affirmative demonstration in the engineering report that another alternative will result in an equivalent level of protection.

(d) The provisions of Chapter 62-604, F.A.C., are applicable to in-ground crossings. No vertical or horizontal separation distances are required for above-ground crossings.

(e) Separation distance requirements in Rules 62-610.469(7)(c) and (d), F.A.C., apply to transmission and distribution systems located in rights-of-ways. Similar separation distances are recommended, but are not required on properties where reclaimed water is being used.

(f) All reclaimed water valves and outlets shall be appropriately tagged or labeled (bearing the words in English and Spanish: “Do not drink” together with the equivalent standard international symbol) to warn the public and employees that the water is not intended for drinking. All piping, pipelines, valves, and outlets shall be color coded, or otherwise marked, to differentiate reclaimed water from domestic or other water. Effective January 1, 1996, underground piping which is not manufactured of metal or concrete, shall be color coded for reclaimed water distribution systems using Pantone Purple 522C using light stable colorants. Underground metal and concrete pipe shall be color coded or marked using purple as a predominant color. If tape is used to mark the pipe, the tape shall be permanently affixed to the top and each side of the pipe (three locations parallel to the axis of the pipe). For pipes less than 24 inches in diameter, a single tape may be used along the top of the pipe. Visible, above-ground portions of the reclaimed water distribution system shall be clearly color coded or marked. New systems and expansions of existing systems for which permit applications are submitted to the Department on or after January 1, 1996, shall comply with this color coding standard. It is recommended, but shall not be required, that distribution and application facilities located on private properties, including residential properties, be color coded using Pantone Purple 522C.

(g) The return of reclaimed water to the reclaimed water distribution system after the reclaimed water has been delivered to a user is prohibited.

(h) The permittee is responsible for conducting inspections within the reclaimed water service area to verify proper connections, monitor proper use of reclaimed water, and minimize the potential for cross-connections. Inspections are required when customers first connect to the reclaimed water distribution system. Periodic inspections are required as specified in the cross-connection control and inspection program.

Specific Authority 403.061, 403.087, FS. Law Implemented 403.021, 403.061, 403.062, 403.085, 403.086, 403.087, 403.088, FS. History - New 4-4-89; Amended 4-2-90, Formerly 17-610.469; Amended 1-9-96, 8-8-99.

Defines maximum contaminant level (mcl), 62-550.200(48):

”MAXIMUM CONTAMINANT LEVEL” (MCL) means the maximum permissible level of a contaminant in water which is delivered to any user of a public water system. Prohibits the introduction of contaminants that do not have a maximum contaminant standard, 62-550.330

62-550.330 Other Contaminants Without a Standard.

No contaminant which creates or has the potential to create an imminent and substantial danger to the public shall be introduced into a public water system.

Specific Authority 403.861(9) FS. Law Implemented 403.852(12), (13), 403.853(1) FS. History–New 11-19-87, Formerly 17-22.230, 17-550.330.

62-555.330 Engineering References for Public Water Systems. In addition to the requirements of this chapter, the requirements and standards contained in the following technical publications are hereby incorporated by reference and shall be applied in determining whether permits to construct or alter a public water system components, excluding wells (but including well pumping equipment and appurtenances), shall be issued or denied. Each of these publications is available from the publisher or source listed for the publication. The specific requirements contained in this chapter supersede the requirements and standards contained in these publications. Where there are conflicts between these publications, suppliers of water and construction permit applicants shall comply with any one of the publications. Where there are multiple options or alternatives in these publications, suppliers of water and construction permit applicants shall comply with any one of the options or alternatives. The Department shall allow exceptions to the requirements and standards in these publications if suppliers of water or construction permit applicants provide justification for each exception and provide alternative design and construction features that achieve the same purpose and that afford a similar level of strength, durability, reliability, and public health protection.

(1) Water Quality and Treatment: A Handbook of Community Water Supplies, Fifth Edition

(2) Water Treatment Plant Design, Third Edition

(3) Recommended Standards for Water Works, 1997 Edition

(4) Standards of the American Water Works Association (AWWA)

(5) Water Fluoridation: A Manual for Engineers and Technicians, September 1986

(6) Recommended Practice for Backflow Prevention and Cross-Connection Control, AWWA Manual M14, Second Edition, 1990, American Water Works Association (AWWA). Published by AWWA, 6666 W. Quincy Avenue, Denver, Colorado 80235.

(7) Ultraviolet Disinfection Guidelines for Drinking Water and Water Reuse, December 2000

(8) Water Distribution Systems Handbook, 1999

Requires that records on backflow prevention be maintained for a period of 10 years, 62-550.720(3):

Copies of any written reports, summaries or communications relating to cross-connection control programs or sanitary surveys of the system conducted by the system itself, by a private consultant, or by any local, State or Federal agency, shall be kept for a period of not less than 10 years after completion of the sanitary survey.

PART VII SURVEILLANCE, RECORD KEEPING, AND REPORTING

62-550.720 Recordkeeping.

Suppliers of water shall retain on their premises, or at a convenient location near their premises, the following records:

(1) Records of bacteriological analyses made under this chapter shall be kept for not less than 5 years. Records of physical, chemical, or radiological analyses made under any portion of this chapter other than Rule 62-550.800, F.A.C., shall be kept for not less than 10 years. Actual laboratory reports may be kept, or data may be transferred to tabular summaries, provided that the information required in Rule 62-550.730, F.A.C., is included.

(2) Records of action taken by the system to correct a violation of primary drinking water regulations shall be kept for a period not less than 3 years after the last action taken with respect to the particular violation involved.

(3) Copies of any written reports, summaries, or communications relating to cross-connection control program or sanitary surveys of the system conducted by the system itself, by a private consultant, or by any local, State or Federal agency, shall be kept for a period not less than 10 years after completion of the sanitary survey.

(4) Records concerning a variance or exemption granted to the system shall be kept for a period ending not less than 5 years following the expiration of the variance and exemption.

(5) Monthly operation reports shall be kept for a period of not less than 10 years.

(6) Any system subject to the requirements of Rule 62-550.800, F.A.C., shall retain, for no fewer than 12 years, original records of all sampling data and analyses, reports, surveys, letters, evaluations, schedules, Department determinations, and any other information required by Rule 62-550.800, F.A.C.

Specific Authority 403.861(9) FS. Law Implemented 403.861(16) FS. History–New 11-19-87, Formerly 17-22.820, Amended 1-18-89, 1-1-93, 7-4-93, Formerly 17-550.720, Amended 11-27-01.